Monday, January 15, 2007
posted by man at 10:51 PM
To late for posting.lol!Well this is last mondays lesson.Relation(Domain and Range)

"Relation"

A relation is any subset of a Cartesian product. For instance, a subset of , called a "binary relation from to ," is a collection of ordered pairs with first components from and second components from , and, in particular, a subset of is called a "relation on ." For a binary relation , one often writes to mean that is in .


Eg.

(2,0),(1,5),(3,8),(4,1) ...(any set of ordered pairs are "relation")

The concept of a relation is a generalization of 2-place relations, such as the relation of equality, denoted by the sign "=" in a statement like "5 + 7 = 12," or the relation of order, denoted by the sign "<" in a statement like "5 < 12". the concept of a relation is a generalization of 2-place relations, such as the relation of equality, denoted by the sign "=" in a statement like "5 + 7 = 12," or the relation of order, denoted by the sign "<" in a statement like "5 < 12".



Relations are classified according to the number of sets in the cartesian product, in other words the number of terms in the expression:

Unary relation or property: L(u)

Binary relation: L(u, v) or u L v

Ternary relation: L(u, v, w)

Quaternary relation: L(u, v, w, x)


Domain and Range

Domain:

For a function f defined by an expression with variable x, the implied domain of f is the set of all real numbers variable x can take such that the expression defining the function is real. The domain can also be given explicitly.

Range:

The range of f is the set of all values that the function takes when x takes values in the domain.
The y-values.

This list of points, being a relationship between certain x's and certain y's, is a relation. The domain is all the x-values, and the range is all the y-values. You list the values without duplication:
{(2, –3), (4, 6), (3, –1), (6, 6), (2, 3)} This are the set of numbers.

domain: {2, 3, 4, 6}

range: {–3, –1, 3, 6}

You can see how we put the numbers in domain and range. All the x were put to domain and all y were put in range..

Well i hope this things will help you:)Good luck
 



1 Comments:


At January 16, 2007 6:27 AM, Blogger Ms. Armstrong

Emman,
This is some very specific mathematical vocabulary and notation that you've used. Did you use another website to source your explanation? If so, you need to credit the author of that site by either creating a link or offering a citation.
Do you understand what you have written?